Kauai Style Episode 1 “Officiants”

Episode 1 in a series of videos related to the event industry in Kauai, stories about wedding officiants, hair and make-up artists, coordinators, caterers and other artists. If you are having/ planning a wedding in Kauai, this video might be a valuable tool in your research, as you’ll see in action the best non-religious officiants on Kauai, ideal for elopement weddings, vow renewals, and events that require official services by a licensed officiant.

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2020 yikes!

2019 bye-bye. You went by in a blink. And so much  happened? Now look, 2020 is almost here.Yikes! I dare not think what will happen.

the wedding 2020

 

Shipwrecked

She walked slowly, her thin shoes not completely shielding her feet from the hot sand. She was nervous… and excited in the same breath. Shore waves, about three feet tall, were crashing along the shoreline. Misty sea-spray was in the air. She took a deep breath,   tasting the briny elixir that was on her lips.  There wasn’t a shipwreck in sight.  But she could see her man, faced away from, as he was meant to at this moment.  He was waiting for her. Her heart began to beat even faster.

Not that I really knew what was going on in the bride’s mind at that moment; I just guessed it.  I had been hired to capture these moments on video.  It’s a typical scene that is experienced by thousands of wedding couples at this particular beach: Shipwrecks Beach. My mind drifted off for a moment, and I wondered, how many ‘shipwreck beaches’ are there? I know that in Greece there’s a Shipwreck Beach that some call Smuggler’s Cove. And I’ve heard that Oregon has a Shipwrecks beach, as does Washington State. In Hawaii there are at least two that I know of, the one at Lanai, aptly named Shipwrecks because it really does have mangled sea vessels littering its shore, and the one that I was on at that very moment: Shipwreck Beach, Poipu, Kauai. But here you wont actually find a shipwreck, not anywhere along the beach or along the spectacular coast. You will, however, see the iconic rock face—Makawehi Point—a sandstone landmark which the bride was presently heading to, and where her groom was waiting. You might have heard about this particular beach for another reason: This is where locals (and some brave tourists) leap thirty-five feet off the rock into the turbulent Pacific. Notably, Harrison Ford and Anne Heche jumped from it for the movie, “6 Days and 7 Nights.”  It’s just a short walk along the sand from the Hyatt Regency and other Poipu resorts, which might also be why so many wedding couples choose this location.  Waves smash again the cliff and when it’s really hot, wedding couples can move twenty feet from the water’s edge and find shade under the canopy of lush ironwood trees. It’s idyllic for dramatic photography and videography. The image below is pulled directly from the video, filmed by me at Shipwreck’s on November 11th 2019.

The groom turned…and gasped as he saw her for the first time that day. His heart was   galloping at a hundred miles an hour.   In his prepared vows, he told how she’d so profoundly changed his life, for the better; that God and destiny had made it so.  When it was her turn, her eyes turned watery and her voice trembled lightly; this also made his eyes glisten.

Fifteen minutes later, the officiant proclaimed them husband and wife and they fell into each other’s embrace. There weren’t any violins but if there had been they wouldn’t have been out of place. Nice ceremony.

A footnote:  there used to be an old weather-beaten boat lying at the water’s edge. It sat there for many years, and that’s where the pirate-like name came from, I guess.

If you know of another Shipwrecks Beach, I’d love to hear about it. Shoot me an email at davidm617@me.com and visit my website: Kauai Video Productions edit 1 Max

 

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Cutaway, Reversal, and Don’t Cross the Line.

I’m David Marsh, a wedding cinematographer in Kauai and this piece is basically about me, what I do and why I’m a bit different,  So what’s “Cutaway, Reversal, and Don’t Cross the Line?” It’s tekkie talk used by film professionals—but not necessarily film professionals that shoot weddings and events because, well,  let’s face it, film production protocols aren’t used at weddings. So you might find it a bit weird that I follow the most intrinsic of these protocols, as taught to me many years ago when I was a supernumerary/ apprentice at Pinewood Film Studios in England. I was seventeen and I’d quit school early because I hated school. My initial training started with knowing the difference between emulsion and celluloid, key numbers and reel numbers, how to recognize fogged film, to know what butterflies, HMI’s and scrims are and how and when to use them—a training that  lasted ten years, as I worked my way up the ladder, becoming a  film and TV editor, a director of independent art films, before I decided to DP and write. After three decades in the film and TV business i decided that I wanted to be a writer of fiction. To facilitate my dream, I segued into wedding cinematography and wedding photography.   To this day, I get really excited to go out and shoot. For photography,  I typically use 2 cameras, one strapped over each shoulder, so that I can easily switch focal lengths without changing lenses.  For video, I mostly shoot with 3 cameras, sometimes four of five.  You might be surprised to know that complex video shoots require fewer cameras because complex shoots typically are crafted with production tools, rails, video cranes, camera stabilizers, an aerial camera, for the creation of designer motion shots.    My 3-camera shoot is a master camera setup and two matching side by side angles. If I’m at a wedding without a second or assistant I keep the set-up easy, 2 or 3 cameras on tripods, wireless microphone on the officiant, back up mic on the groom.   For more adventurous shoots, my third camera is set up for mobility, tracking shots, slides, etc. I still try very hard never to cross the line—the 180-degree golden rule line.

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wedding photography by David Marsh.

More about me at Kauai Video Productions 

 

Tunnels Beach, kauai, back again

On April 14th 2018, the skies above Kauai opened releasing rainfall like I’d never imagined, a barrage of non-stop lightning and thunder like artillery fire shaking the foundations of my home.  The storm raged for over a day. When it eventually left us, I saw first hand some of the substantial and devastating damage, the worst on Kauai since Hurricane Iniki in 1992. The rain had been record-breaking, over 50 inches, the most in a 24-hour period ever recorded on American soil.  The landslides and flash flooding left homes in ruin, turned streets into rivers, and reduced a massive swath of the north shore into an unlivable shamble. The highway leading from Hanalei north was destroyed, mile after mile, and would remain closed for over a year while construction crews worked tirelessly to rebuild. All of the spectacular beaches on the north shore including Hanalei’s Black Pot and the pier were closed to the public, both residents and tourists alike.  Tunnels beach, one of the most spectacular beaches in the world would not see a tourist for fifteen months. I ventured to Tunnels this month, my first venture back since the April storm. The sun had just risen. The beach was pristine.  And my photo shoot was a blast. At last, the north shore is back!

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Not all wedding videos cost a bundle

Candidly, it boils down to 2 factors: time and complexity. But if it’s kept simple, just the ceremony filmed,and it’s post produced with minimal editing, then there’s no reason the wedding video—a really well shot video with awesome sound—should cost more than $500. And that’s my fee for a simple wedding video. Here’s a few samples.

You can reserve your wedding video by visiting my main website http://www.kauaivideoproductions.com

At Kalalau lookout for a Kauai wedding

How many hours do you think the videographer spent filming this Kauai wedding?
Wedding cinematographer: Difraser

Two hours won’t cut the mustard, as they say. To pull off a dynamic wedding video like this takes a bunch of hours. I shot this one a few years ago, but to the best of my recall I arrived at the lookout early for a morning ceremony, spent 2 hours at the lookout, then we headed to Poipu and I filmed for another 4 hours. If you’re looking for something as elaborate as this—by the way this is only the highlights video, the full length feature is thirty minutes long—ask me about my premium package. http://www.kauaivideoproductions.com

A few years ago, in the age of camera sliders, on a sunny beach in Kauai

Besides great cameras and film lenses, I fashion my videos with all sorts of tools. Of course tripods with professional fluid heads—that’s a given for any pro, but I also use short dollies called sliders, and regular dollies with thirty feet of track—for beach weddings in Kauai not very practical. Then I use jibs and film cranes—again, for a small beach wedding a bit of an overkill, although I love the cinematic look of crane shots. I now also offer aerial shots using a DJI Inspire quadcopter. All in all, the slider is my pick of the crop, light and small enough for the beach or anywhere yet it packs a mighty cinematic punch. If you like the look of this Kauai wedding video with the cinematic feel, and you’d like to book me for your upcoming event, please contact me through my home website at http://www.kauaivideoproductions.com.  I am both a cinematographer and photographer and I love both mediums.